Apartments for Cheap

Questions and Answers

Your Questions About Cheap Apartments In Staten Island For Rent

January 18, 2013

Joseph asks…

how can i rent an apartment in manhattan being self-employed (having no employer)?

I’m asking specifically in regards to what documents you will need to show real estate agents or landlords regarding proog of income, etc? Are they hard up with self-employed/freelancers?

Administrator answers:

A cheap, ratty, small, bug infested apartment STARTS at around $1500-$2000/month in NYC. GOOD LUCK! YOur best bet is to stay off the island and get an apartment in Queens or Staten Island. It’s still considered NYC, unless your a native. Even Newark is cheaper than staying in NYC. Just gotta hit the tunnel(s) when you need to be in the city,

Robert asks…

Where’s the best place to rent? $3,200 budget?

I’m 25 and looking to move to NYC with my friend. We’ve got a $3,200 budget for rent. I’m a social person. I’m also single and don’t know ANYONE in NYC. What’s the best place for me? Distance from work isn’t an issue, I work remotely. Also, back to the single thing.. I like to party and I’m generally attracted to european / model type girls (don’t ask me why, I know they’re a fucking pain) what bars or area should I look? Please be realistic, I don’t know if $3,200 is even a lot for a 2/br so I’m assuming SoHo i’snt even an option.

Thank you for your help!

Administrator answers:

Way more then enough to move to any part of the new york city. Go for brooklyn or staten island. Brooklyn is very yuppie now and is just like manhattan now. And if you go to staten island move right by the ferry. Its very yuppish to and the ferry is only a 30 min ride and your in the city. And staten island apartments by the ferry are going to be soooo much cheaper then the neighborhoods in brooklyn your looking for

Steven asks…

How much would it cost to rent a low-quality tiny apartment in Manhattan? …and in the surrounding buroughs?

I’d like to live in NYC for awhile, but I don’t have a ton of money to spend on an apartment. On the other hand, I’m VERY unpicky. I don’t need much space at all (I even lived in my car for several months as I roamed the country, and enjoyed it), and I don’t care about an apartment being “nice” either. If I can sleep there, cook there, shower there, and not get repeatedly mugged there, it’s just fine.

So, how much would a relatively cheap place like this cost in Manhattan? How about in the surrounding buroughs (within a subway ride of Manhattan)?

Thanks!

Administrator answers:

You and everyone else wants to live here.
New York is very expensive!
Anyways,
-Bronx; $800 and up
- Manhattan; $2,000 and up
-Brooklyn; $1600 and up
-Staten Island; $1,000 and up
- Queens; $1200 and up

http://www.new-york-rent.com/root/

George asks…

Moving to NYC in summer of 2013?

I’m entering my senior year of high school in August and I’ve started thinking about life after graduation. I’m 100% committed to the plan of moving to NYC. Now you go attacking me I have spent many summers in New York so I’m quite familiar with the city and atmosphere. But I want to know some answers on the following things:
1. Renting a room? Is it a good idea or not
2. Good grocery stores. I’ll be coming from Florida and I will be leaving my native (and favorite) supermarket, Publix.
3. Subway vs. busing
4. Cheap entertainment
5. Neighborhoods to avoid (I’m trying to live in an urban neighborhood but not on where every night people are partying or a neighborhood thats isn’t complete tourist trap)
6. Saving money.
7. Places toursit tend to avoid.

Thank you so much!

Administrator answers:

Your very questions show that you lack enough information to make this decision yet. The questions are all wrong.

Let’s take them one at a time:

1. Renting a room – well, you’d better rent SOMETHING. Otherwise, where will you sleep? I’m the street? If not a “room” then what? You’ll need an apartment. And, without a college degree, you won’t be able to afford an apartment without a roommate. (Or possibly even with one, but more on that later.)

2. Good grocery stores??? – NYC is not known for good grocery stores. There are a few that appeal to the organic minded, fresh produce set, but again, without a college degree, you can’t afford that. Most New Yorkers don’t spend a lot of time in grocery stores, anyway. We buy a few things on the way home from work, usually. There are small stores everywhere.

3. Subway vs. Busing??? Another crazy question. People take a lot of subways here. We only take the bus when a subway isn’t practical, like in an area poorly served by subways (usually pretty far out in the outer boroughs or on Staten Island.) so it depends on where you’ll be living. And you won’t know that till you get here.

4. Cheap entertainment – you ask about this before you ask about finding a job???? Get a job first. There are tons of free and cheap things to do. You’ll find something to amuse you. Getting a job will be harder!

5. Considering you’ll need some place very cheap to live, your big worry won’t be people who are partying. You should be worrying about finding somewhere you can afford that isn’t in a dangerous neighborhood. While there are fewer dangerous parts of NYC than there once were, people without a lot of money to spend on rent often get lured into renting somewhere that just isn’t safe. Worry less about partying and tourists and more about drug dealers.

6. Saving money – that’s up to you. Start earning some first.

7. Places tourists tend to avoid. – if you really do come here, you’ll find them. But given the above questions I have my doubts you’ll end up here. This has fantasy written all over it!

You’re more worried about lifestyle stuff then the practical facts about surviving without the skills to get a good job. Look, go to college, get a degree, and THEN come to NYC! Then you MIGHT be able to afford it. You’ll at least be old enough to understand what is actually involved.

Thomas asks…

Living in New York City right out of high school?

I’m entering my senior year of high school in August and I’ve started thinking about life after graduation. I’m 100% committed to the plan of moving to NYC. Now you go attacking me I have spent many summers in New York so I’m quite familiar with the city and atmosphere. But I want to know some answers on the following things:
1. Renting a room? Is it a good idea or not
2. Good grocery stores. I’ll be coming from Florida and I will be leaving my native (and favorite) supermarket, Publix.
3. Subway vs. busing
4. Cheap entertainment
5. Neighborhoods to avoid (I’m trying to live in an urban neighborhood but not on where every night people are partying or a neighborhood thats isn’t complete tourist trap)
6. Saving money.
7. Places toursit tend to avoid.

Thank you so much!

Administrator answers:

Your very questions show that you lack enough information to make this decision yet. The questions are all wrong.

Let’s take them one at a time:

1. Renting a room – well, you’d better rent SOMETHING. Otherwise, where will you sleep? I’m the street? If not a “room” then what? You’ll need an apartment. And, without a college degree, you won’t be able to afford an apartment without a roommate. (Or possibly even with one, but more on that later.)

2. Good grocery stores??? – NYC is not known for good grocery stores. There are a few that appeal to the organic minded, fresh produce set, but again, without a college degree, you can’t afford that. Most New Yorkers don’t spend a lot of time in grocery stores, anyway. We buy a few things on the way home from work, usually. There are small stores everywhere.

3. Subway vs. Busing??? Another crazy question. People take a lot of subways here. We only take the bus when a subway isn’t practical, like in an area poorly served by subways (usually pretty far out in the outer boroughs or on Staten Island.) so it depends on where you’ll be living. And you won’t know that till you get here.

4. Cheap entertainment – you ask about this before you ask about finding a job???? Get a job first. There are tons of free and cheap things to do. You’ll find something to amuse you. Getting a job will be harder!

5. Considering you’ll need some place very cheap to live, your big worry won’t be people who are partying. You should be worrying about finding somewhere you can afford that isn’t in a dangerous neighborhood. While there are fewer dangerous parts of NYC than there once were, people without a lot of money to spend on rent often get lured into renting somewhere that just isn’t safe. Worry less about partying and tourists and more about drug dealers.

6. Saving money – that’s up to you. Start earning some first.

7. Places tourists tend to avoid. – if you really do come here, you’ll find them. But given the above questions I have my doubts you’ll end up here. This has fantasy written all over it!

You’re more worried about lifestyle stuff then the practical facts about surviving without the skills to get a good job. Look, go to college, get a degree, and THEN come to NYC! Then you MIGHT be able to afford it. You’ll at least be old enough to understand what is actually involved.

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