Apartments for Cheap

Questions and Answers

Your Questions About Free Apartment Lease Form

June 1, 2013

Thomas asks…

How do you move out and live on your own at age 19?Please Answer!!!!!!!!?

I’m a girl btw

Administrator answers:

I’ve been living in my own apartment since age 18 and trust me, it’s not easy. You need a good paying job, as well as some form of credit or a co-signer because no apartments will let you sign a lease without adequate credit, especially if you are under the age of 21. Since you’re just starting out, I recommend public assistance such as free medical insurance and food stamps. Trust me, it will help out A LOT. Keep excess spending to a bare minimum, and see if someone can throw you a housewarming party so you can have some supplies for your new place (towels, toaster, etc.). If you can’t have the party, try shopping at thrift stores and finding things on Craigslist. What you need to do RIGHT NOW is start applying for jobs if you don’t already have one. If so, look through the newspaper for apartments in the area you want to live. Highlight the ones that are in your price range. Many apartments require an application fee, security deposit, and first month’s rent, so be ready. Find one that has free utilities and appliances included if possible. Good luck!

Mandy asks…

Apartment complex has been charging pet rent, but its not in the contract.?

I recently obtained a copy of my rental agreement to look at something totally unrelated to my question. However, upon looking at the agreement I noticed that they have been charging me $40 more then the amount stated. When I approached the property manager about this, she stated that the $40 was for pet rent. I then pointed out on my contract that it clearly says that I pad a refundable deposit, and non-refundable deposit and I have $0 in pet rent. Also, both of my pets are listed on the contract so I was never trying to hide them.

After pointing this out, she quickly told me it was a typo and that she would correct it and print out a new agreement for me to sign. I felt that it was wrong for them to simply change the contract in the middle of my lease, considering this page clearly had my signature AND the person who filed my paperwork. She said that she understood where I was coming from, but there was nothing she could do about it. She then gave me a website to fill out a form to contact someone higher then her that might be able to help.

Can they legally change my contract 7 months into it because of an error on their end? My water, sewage, etc… is all in my monthly rent which is automatically deducted each month so I never felt a need to question the amount that they have been charging.
Thanks for the answers guys. I had a feeling that they couldn’t modify it mid contract.

For the record, I did NOT know I was supposed to be paying pet rent. This complex has switched management 3 times in the last 1 1/2 years and each time things are handled differently. I also will not be renewing at the end of this contract for this reason.

Administrator answers:

No, they cannot do that. They owe you what you overpaid, and they must wait until your current lease is up before changing it. If you need help with this, see if your community has a landlord-tenants association. If not, a local law school may be able to help for free. Or see if your lease has a mediation clause in it.

Carol asks…

How much should I save?

I’m just trying to get an idea of how much I should try to save before I move. The rent per month is 525, and I’m hoping to be there by the end of the year. I am starting a new job and making almost 1,100 a month. I’m new at this and hoping I can get some advice, especially from those of you that are new renters. :) Please help.
Um, how am I supposed to save 22,000 by the end of the year when I’m only making 1,100 a month??

Administrator answers:

Build a budget including all income and expenses. Typical monthly expenses include: Rent, Loans, Water, Cable, Internet, Phone, Electricity, Car Insurance, Renter’s insurance, Groceries, Gasoline, and spending money. The cost of bills depends on where you live. There are lots of free budget forms for download; also check out DaveRamsey.com and mint.com for help budgeting. Rent should never be more than a third of income; many landlords verify this before they’ll offer a lease. If you don’t have enough money coming in to cover these expenses, consider getting a roommate.

Make a savings plan to prepare for moving out. There are lots of “start-up” costs involved in moving out the first time. Deposits for apartment and deposits/installation fees for bills are the largest factor. Other things to save for are: Furniture (bed, couch/chairs, coffee/side tables, TV stand), electronics (TV, Computer, Microwave), Pots & pans, Dishware, Silverware, Bedding, towels, and the list goes on. Buy items that are easy to move before moving to decrease the amount you’re spending at one time. In addition to saving for the items listed above, put some in savings for a “rainy day” in case of job loss, medical emergency or car accident. $1,000 is the minimum, 3-6 months bills is recommended.

A great way to prepare for living on your own is to live by this budget before you move out and put what you expect to pay in bills into a savings account. Not only does this get you in the habit of living off the money budgeted for non-essential items, but it’s a great way to build up savings.

Betty asks…

How can i move out successfully?

these answers arent helpful at all :( (

Administrator answers:

This question is more suited for the personal finance section, not employment. That may explain why the answers haven’t met your needs.

Build a budget including all income and expenses. Typical monthly expenses include: Rent, Loans, Water, Cable, Internet, Phone, Electricity, Car Insurance, Renter’s insurance, Groceries, Gasoline, and spending money. The cost of bills depends on where you live. There are lots of free budget forms for download; also check out DaveRamsey.com and mint.com for help budgeting. Rent should never be more than a third of income; many landlords verify this before they’ll offer a lease. If you don’t have enough money coming in to cover these expenses, consider getting a roommate.

Make a savings plan to prepare for moving out. There are lots of “start-up” costs involved in moving out the first time. Deposits for apartment and bills are the largest factor. Other things to save for are: Furniture (bed, couch/chairs, coffee/side tables, TV stand), electronics (TV, Computer, Microwave), Pots & pans, Dishware, Silverware, Bedding, towels, and the list goes on. Buy items that are easy to move before moving to decrease the amount you’re spending at one time. In addition to saving for the items listed above, put some in savings for a “rainy day” in case of job loss, medical emergency or car accident. $1,000 is the minimum, 3-6 months bills is recommended.

A great way to start on your own is to live by this budget before you move out and put what you expect to pay in bills into a savings account. Not only does this get you in the habit of living off the money budgeted for non-essential items, but it’s a great way to build up savings.

Lizzie asks…

I need a lease contract?

I am renting an apartment to someone. I need a lease form between the two of us. Can anyone send me one or give me a good site where i can get one for free?

Administrator answers:

Google or Office Depot

Joseph asks…

Lease Question? Breaking Lease?

Now before I begin, I am well aware that when I moved in I signed a contract. Now to my situation. I moved to Boston a few months ago to continue my education. I live with one of my best friends, who is also studying at the same university. We have only been living here for about 4 months. We have a place in Somerville and rent is 1300 a month, no utilities included. We have a great landlord who happens to have a daughter who goes to the same university as us and he has been most helpful and friendly. My roommate just informed me that his mother is very sick and he has to return to Paris and theres a possibility he will not return. Now I cannot afford the rent by myself. Even with work and all. The Lease I signed is the RHA Standard Form Apartment Lease Fixed Term (2000/2001 Edition).
As for breaking the lease it says the following:

Lessee’s Covenants in Event of Termination Clause The Lessee covenants that in case of any termination of this lease, by reason of the default of the Lessee, then at the option of Lessor:
(A) the Lessee will forthwith pay to the Lessor as damages hereunder a sum equal to the amount by which the rent and other payments called for hereunder for the remainder of the term or any extension or renewal thereof exceed the fair rental value of said premises for the remainder of the term or any extension or renewal thereof; and
(B) the Lessee covenants that he will furthermore indemnify the Lessor from and against any loss and damage sustained by reason of any termination caused by the default of, or the breach by, the Lessee. Lessor’s damages hereunder shall include, but shall not be limited to any loss of rents; reasonable broker’s commissions for the re-letting of the leased premises; advertising costs; the reasonable cost incurred in cleaning and repainting the premises in order to relet the same; and moving and storage charges incurred by Lessor in moving Lessee’s belongings pursuant to eviction proceedings.
(C) At the option of the Lessor, however, Lessor’s cause of action under this article shall accrue when a new tenancy or lease term first commences subsequent to a termination under this lease, in which event Lessor’s damages shall be limited to any and all damages sustained by him prior to said new tenancy or lease date.

Now I understand that it is basically saying that if I break the lease I am responsible for all the rent of the months I have not payed or the time that it is vacant. Now my question is, if I find someone else to move in and take over the contract, does that mean I am not liable anymore? Contracts are contracts but it also says I take over repairs or additions and that I need to inform him of any thing and so far he didnt care what I did. He installed new locks for free, etc. I would love to stay here but I do not want to default and be evicted because I cannot pay rent. Any help or experience would be greatly appreciated!
So far thank you for the help! Some of the best I’ve seen in all the questions asked. I am obviously trying to do it the right way. I don’t want him or myself to suffer financially and I’d rather pay two months in rent when I am not living here to help him find a new tenant, than pay for the rest of year. I will do what I can to help him, when the time comes. Any more help is greatly appreciated!

Administrator answers:

Your lease is stating that you are responsible for rent through the end of your lease OR until a replacement if found, whichever occurs first. It is your responsibility to cover the costs of finding a new tenant, and s/he must be approved by your landlord. Since you are on a lease with a roomate, your choices are to either (a) find a new roomate to continue your current lease; the way you divvy up rent is between you two, or (b) find someone to take over the lease and move out yourself. If (b) happens, you are released from your obligation the second a new tenant starts paying rent; your landlord cannot double-dip and collect rent twice for the same time period.

Talk to your landlord, let him know what’s going on, and see what sort of option would work best for you. In the future, I would advise strongly against renting a place you cannot afford on your own, even if you have roomates, because things happen.

Paul asks…

ex girlfriend trying to take me to court?

i told my ex girlfriend in a text that i would help her pay her rent. since we have broke up i told her to find her own way to pay rent. she in now trying to take me to court for the rent money. i am not on the lease any where and it was only in a text message. is there actually anything that she can do
i was not and have not been living with her. i am in korea in the army and she is in kentucky. i have never once stepped foot in her place

Administrator answers:

Possibly with a good lawyer on her side who can twist things in her favor. IF you were living with her at the time and sharing the apartment then you could be made to pay for any utilities, etc and rent during that time. However if you are not on any lease nor have signed any form of legal statement between the two of you then she can’t legally get you for the time you have not lived there. I would though get ahold of a lawyer and ask them. You can call most of them for a free consultation on a first visit or first contact. Just to make sure I’d call two different ones to see if they both say the same thing.

Jenny asks…

Can someone just rip up a legally binding contract? NEED LEGAL ADVICE PLEASE?

Me and my room mate resigned our lease at our apartments yesterday. We signed the apartment lease and renewed our carport. They sent our a news letter last month saying that they were giving 3 months of free carport rent so I asked the lady about it and she printed out the incentive form for the 3 free months and me and my roommate both signed it. Now this morning I find out they called my roommate and told him they made and error. Only people who have never had a car port get 3 months free and people who renew don’t get the discount so they are “ripping up” the incentive page. My roommate not knowing said ok but my name is right next to his on the paper and they never contacted me about this. Can they legally rip up a binding contract just because they made and error? So now they have the contract saying that we have to pay $25 a month for this carport for the next 12 months but the incentive page that said we get 3 months free has been destroyed. So without the 3 months free I don’t want the damn carport but of coarse I didn’t get a copy of this page. I need to know my legal rights. Should I get the 3 free months? Do I have to still keep the carport? Need help please!
I don’t have any other proof besides the two women who both said it was ok yesterday. But the manager looked over the contracts today and found the “error”

Administrator answers:

Well, you had already agreed to renew your carport before the 3 free months ever came up. You had a contract. The 3 free months contract was a modification, and it isn’t binding on the complex because there was no new consideration. You were already under an obligation to pay $25/month and they were already under an obligation to let you use the carport. The new contract doesn’t affect their obligation under the original contract, but it completely relieves you of your obligations.

A contract modification is not binding unless there is new consideration.

Steven asks…

Americans tell me all you know about the “founding fathers”…?

Tell me about Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Patrick Henry, even Ethan Allen…Tell me why these people are or are not your heroes…

“Give me liberty or give me death…” Heck, just tell me what liberty is… What is freedom?
Excellent Map, please elaborate…

Administrator answers:

The Founding Fathers were heroes.

Give me liberty or give me death. Patrick Henry.
Liberty:
You have the freedom (choice) to go to college.
You have the freedom (choice) to not go to college.
You have the freedom to move to another city, another state if you do not like your current home.
You have the freedom to pick a job.
You do not like the job you just got – well you should be able to quit that job and look for another job.
You are free to go to to the store and buy meat, vegetables, or milk.
You are free to turn on your heater or your air conditioner if you have the ability to pay the bill.
You are free to adopt a 4 legged furry friend depending on where you live.
You are free to buy a house if you have the ability to pay for it.
You are free to move from one apartment to another. You do not need permission of the government. You do need to live up to any lease you may have signed.

In many governments they will tell you what job you will do, where you will live and how much you will be paid and how much you will pay for the apartment.

Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Patrick Henry were heroes. They were able to put together a new form of government that would give me the right to own land, the right to sell that land, the right to go to the Church of my choice or the right not to go to Church. They gave us a, “We the people of the United States” not “They the government”.

The founding fathers were committing treason in the eyes of Great Britain. They knew that when they wrote “And for the support of this Declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our Lives, our Fortunes and our sacred Honor.”

They were able to win the war and became Founding Fathers and not traitors because of the victory.
Edit:
Hannah
I do not know what more you would like to know. I would love to keep going about our Founding Fathers but Yahoo limits the length of an answer and I am guessing I am almost there. If you see this will you edit your question as to what else you want to know?
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