Apartments for Cheap

Questions and Answers

Your Questions About Studio Homes Las Vegas

May 8, 2012

Sandy asks…

What do I need to have a home music studio?

Give me a list of the main things of what I need to have a home studio and if you please tell me where to get it in las Vegas
big points for best answer

Administrator answers:

The basics needed for a home studio are:
1) A mic&mic stand, and mic cable to record vocals and instruments with
2) Maybe a midi keyboard for synthesizer sounds
3) An audio interface to connect the mic(s) to your….
4) Computer. Either a laptop or a desktop.
5) Software to capture (record) and mix the sound
6) Good speakers and or headphones to listen to you masterpieces
There is a wide range of quality of all of the above. Microphones can cost less than $100 to $15,000 for a professional tube mic. (A Shure SM58 is a good inexpensive vocal mic. And the Audio-Technica AT4040 is really good @ $300) The same price range is true with the interfaces, which converts the sound of the mic to digital information which gets recorded onto your hard drive. To get started, Digidesign, the makers of Pro Tools, offers a few choices like the Mbox (it comes with an interface and the software) and the M-Audio software (which is pro tools software that can use most manufacturers interfaces). Logic is another good choice. There are many others that can be found on retailer’s websites, like sweetwater.com or musiciansfriend.com. Audacity is free recording and editing software. An extra might be a mixing board to use in between the mic and the interface, so you can adjust the sound of the mic a bit before recording it. Add extra mics/cables if you are going to record more than one instrument/voice at the same time.

Helen asks…

California business license for singing studio?

I just moved to the Sacramento Ca area from Las Vegas. In Las Vegas I ran a vocal arts studio for singers and professional speakers. While getting started (1-2 years) I will be running the studio out of my home and I want to know if I need a license while I am in the home. This is a small business, only grossing about 30K per year.

I have a trip planned to go downtown to investigate this in a week or so, but I want to try and get a general feel for what the requirements are, etc.

Thanks!
f

Administrator answers:

Go to the CalGOLD website or California Business Permitting database website, which provides permitting information to businesses and the public

http://www.calgold.ca.gov/

I am currently getting a database error with the site, but you can choose the type of business you want, the county you will operate it in and the site will give you a list of al the requirements and what office you need to contact

Paul asks…

Tour: San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego, Las Vegas?

From the 27th of October to the 18th of November, I’m going with 3 friends in California.. we’ll land in San Francisco and then we’ll rent a car.

This is the planning:

27 San Francisco

28 Alcatraz and downtown

29 Muir Woods + last night in SF

30 SF – Yosemite – night near Fresno

31 Sequoia Park – night somewhere

1 LA – Malibu/Santa Monica – night (don’t know)

2 Neighbourhoods.. Venice, Manhattan … – night (don’t know)

3 Hollywood Studios, – night (don’t know)

4 Six Flag maybe – night (don’t know)

5 Los Angeles Harbour/Anaheim + maybe a Lakers match (but I’ve to understand how to buy tickets) – night (don’t know)

6 Huntington Beach + Newport + Travel from LA to San Diego or stop somewhere (as Oceanside) – night (don’t know)

7 San Diego – night (don’t know)

8 La Jolla + Old Town -night (don’t know)

9 A friend of us is leaving.. last day in San Diego

10 Travel to Phoenix – night Phoenix

11 Phoenix => Montezuma Castle + Anasazi, night in Flagstaff (?)

12 Grand Canyon – night next to Kayenta

13 Monument Valley (where is it precisely??? How many miles from Kayenta??) + night next to Page (Kayenta or somewhere)

14 Page + Lake Powell + night next to Bryce canyon

15 Bryce Canyon + Zion, night in St George

16 Travel to Las Vegas + Night in Las Vegas

17 Las Vegas => without sleeping… 5.15 in airport!

18 Bankrupt and back home

Please, give me some suggestions of places to go at night in the different cities (if disco, also with the price if possible) or where is it possible to find many people having party or something like that :P

Other suggestions about Accomodations, Hostels??

Administrator answers:

San Diego’s Gaslamp Quarter has lots of nightclubs. One of my favorites is The Shout House. It has 2 dueling pianos and lots of audience participation. Lots of fun. There is a cover charge of $10 on the weekends…but I believe it’s less and even free on some nightdays.

While in San Diego some of my favorite things to do is kayaking through the La Jolla Caves, driving to the top of Mt. Soledad for panoramic views, a bay cruise, and beach bonfires. For details on things to do in San Diego and recommendations on places to stay visit http://www.sandiego-romantics.com.

If you enjoy wine, consider wine tasting at some of California’s wineries. There are wineries throughout California and many of them allow you to sample their wine for free. Learn more about California wineries at http://www.cheers2wine.com.

If you want to tour Alcatraz, be sure to make reservations at least a few weeks in advance. They sell out. I’d suggest taking the ferry over to Sausilito. Walking across the Golden Gate Bridge is also a fun experience.

Whatever you do…have fun!

Carol asks…

Are bad drug deals by U.S. Citizens the reason why Mexican drug lords enter the US?

If this GRANDFATHER hadn’t stolen millions, or even made drug deals with the Mexican Drug Lords, they would never have even entered America. So are U.S. Citizens like this the ones inviting this kind of crime to enter America?

http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-kidnap18-2008oct18,0,3617272.story

Cole Puffinburger’s grandfather allegedly stole millions from Mexican meth dealers

LAS VEGAS — Police officials said Friday that a group of men may have kidnapped a 6-year-old boy here this week because his grandfather allegedly stole millions of dollars from Mexican methamphetamine dealers, a violent retaliatory tactic rarely seen north of the border.

On Friday, police named Cole’s grandfather, Clemens Fred Tinnemeyer, as a “person of interest” in the investigation. Tinnemeyer, 51, purportedly owed the drug dealers $8 million to $20 million, according to the Las Vegas Review-Journal.

Investigators also were looking into whether other family members may have been involved in drug operations.

In a 2001 bankruptcy filing, Tinnemeyer and his wife listed $226,500 in assets and about $329,000 in liabilities. They had three mortgages on their Las Vegas home and tens of thousands of dollars in credit card debt.

Tinnemeyer had worked as a carpenter for more than two decades, according to the bankruptcy filing. He and his wife, then a food preparer and custodian at the local school district, made about $3,800 a month.

The bankruptcy filing said that in 2000 an ex-partner had stolen $80,000 in studio equipment from them.

Administrator answers:

Yes. If we didn’t love to smoke, snort, and inject their drugs there would be no reason for them to be here in the first place. The problem starts at home.

Robert asks…

I have a homework question? please help?

For Hollywood, the 1960s and early 1970s were grim years. Theater attendance dropped to half of what it had been ten years before. In 1963 only 121 features were released. This was an all-time low. Prestige productions such as Cleopatra (1963) and Paint Your Wagon (1969) bombed at the box office. In the studios, chaos reigned. They were devastated and demoralized by the advent of television. The divestiture of their theaters and the challenge of European art films also caused concern. As a result, management was at a loss about where to turn. The old-time movie moguls who had ruled their empires with iron fists for so many years had died, retired, or been forced out. A series of sell-offs to large conglomerates made the studios part of much larger corporate entities. They were now answerable to financial wizards who had little background in the movie business. In 1969 Kinney National Services purchased Warner Bros. They were a company that owned parking lots and funeral homes. The once great and powerful Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer was sold to financier Kirk Kerkorian. He wanted the studio’s logo to put on his Las Vegas hotel. M-G-M went out of business entirely for almost a decade, beginning in 1973. This corporate instability led to much inefficiency, not the least of which was a revolving-door system for top executives. Each new regime was, quite naturally, inclined to ignore the films made under the auspices of the last group in its quest to make its own mark; thus, many worthy productions got dumped or shelved.

Which of the following statements is true?

a)Theater attendance was 50 percent lower in the 60s than it was in the 50s.
b)The early 70s were a glamorous time for Hollywood.
c)Most studio management positions were stable in the 60s and early 70s.
d)Kirk Kerkorian purchased Warner Bros. in 1969.

Administrator answers:

A C D true

Joseph asks…

Tell me your option on this ?

A letter from the boss

Posted on Monday, January 19, 2009 9:35:25 AM by Las Vegas Ron
To All My Valued Employees,
There have been some rumblings around the office about the future of this company, and more specifically, your job. As you know, the economy has changed for the worse and presents many challenges. However, the good news is this: The economy doesn’t pose a threat to your job. What does threaten your job however, is the changing political landscape in this country.
However, let me tell you some little tidbits of fact which might help you decide what is in your best interests.
First, while it is easy to spew rhetoric that casts employers against employees, you have to understand that for every business owner there is a back story. This back story is often neglected and overshadowed by what you see and hear. Sure, you see me park my Mercedes outside. You’ve seen my big home at last years Christmas party. I’m sure; all these flashy icons of luxury conjure up some idealized thoughts about my life.
However, what you don’t see is the back story.
I started this company 28 years ago. At that time, I lived in a 300 square foot studio apartment for 3 years. My entire living apartment was converted into an office so I could put forth 100% effort into building a company, which by the way, would eventually employ you.
My diet consisted of Ramen Pride noodles because every dollar I spent went back into this company. I drove a rusty Toyota Corolla with a defective transmission. I didn’t have time to date. Often times, I stayed home on weekends, while my friends went out drinking and partying. In fact, I was married to my business — hard work, discipline, and sacrifice.
Meanwhile, my friends got jobs. They worked 40 hours a week and made a modest $50K a year and spent every dime they earned. They drove flashy cars and lived in expensive homes and wore fancy designer clothes. Instead of hitting the Nordstrom’s for the latest hot fashion item, I was trolling through the Goodwill store extracting any clothing item that didn’t look like it was birthed in the 70′s. My friends refinanced their mortgages and lived a life of luxury. I, however, did not. I put my time, my money, and my life into a business with a vision that eventually, some day, I too, will be able to afford these luxuries my friends supposedly had.
So, while you physically arrive at the office at 9am, mentally check in at about noon, and then leave at 5pm, I don’t. There is no “off” button for me. When you leave the office, you are done and you have a weekend all to yourself. I unfortunately do not have the freedom. I eat, and breathe this company every minute of the day. There is no rest. There is no weekend. There is no happy hour. Every day this business is attached to my hip like a 1 year old special-needs child. You, of course, only see the fruits of that garden — the nice house, the Mercedes, the vacations… You never realize the back story and the sacrifices I’ve made.
Now, the economy is falling apart and I, the guy that made all the right decisions and saved his money, have to bail-out all the people who didn’t. The people that overspent their paychecks suddenly feel entitled to the same luxuries that I earned and sacrificed a decade of my life for.
Yes, business ownership has is benefits but the price I’ve paid is steep and not without wounds.
Unfortunately, the cost of running this business, and employing you, is starting to eclipse the threshold of marginal benefit and let me tell you why:
I am being taxed to death and the government thinks I don’t pay enough. I have state taxes. Federal taxes. Property taxes. Sales and use taxes. Payroll taxes. Workers compensation taxes. Unemployment taxes. Taxes on taxes. I have to hire a tax man to manage all these taxes and then guess what? I have to pay taxes for employing him. Government mandates and regulations and all the accounting that goes with it, now occupy most of my time. On Oct 15th, I wrote a check to the US Treasury for $288,000 for quarterly taxes. You know what my “stimulus” check was? Zero. Nada. Zilch.
The question I have is this: Who is stimulating the economy? Me, the guy who has provided 14 people good paying jobs and serves over 2,200,000 people per year with a flourishing business? Or, the single mother sitting at home pregnant with her fourth child waiting for her next welfare check? Obviously, government feels the latter is the economic stimulus of this country.
The fact is, if I deducted (Read: Stole) 50% of your paycheck you’d quit and you wouldn’t work here. I mean, why should you? That’s nuts. Who wants to get rewarded only 50% of their hard work? Well, I agree which is why your job is in jeopardy.
Here is what many of you don’t understand … to stimulate the economy you need to stimulate what runs the economy. Had suddenly government mandated to me that I didn’t need to pay taxes, guess what? Instead of depositing that $288,000 into th

Administrator answers:

I kinda feel for the man..ya know? Work hard and pay someone else more then you make. Run outa room for the rest?

James asks…

Tell me what you think?

A letter from the boss

Posted on Monday, January 19, 2009 9:35:25 AM by Las Vegas Ron
To All My Valued Employees,
There have been some rumblings around the office about the future of this company, and more specifically, your job. As you know, the economy has changed for the worse and presents many challenges. However, the good news is this: The economy doesn’t pose a threat to your job. What does threaten your job however, is the changing political landscape in this country.
However, let me tell you some little tidbits of fact which might help you decide what is in your best interests.
First, while it is easy to spew rhetoric that casts employers against employees, you have to understand that for every business owner there is a back story. This back story is often neglected and overshadowed by what you see and hear. Sure, you see me park my Mercedes outside. You’ve seen my big home at last years Christmas party. I’m sure; all these flashy icons of luxury conjure up some idealized thoughts about my life.
However, what you don’t see is the back story.
I started this company 28 years ago. At that time, I lived in a 300 square foot studio apartment for 3 years. My entire living apartment was converted into an office so I could put forth 100% effort into building a company, which by the way, would eventually employ you.
My diet consisted of Ramen Pride noodles because every dollar I spent went back into this company. I drove a rusty Toyota Corolla with a defective transmission. I didn’t have time to date. Often times, I stayed home on weekends, while my friends went out drinking and partying. In fact, I was married to my business — hard work, discipline, and sacrifice.
Meanwhile, my friends got jobs. They worked 40 hours a week and made a modest $50K a year and spent every dime they earned. They drove flashy cars and lived in expensive homes and wore fancy designer clothes. Instead of hitting the Nordstrom’s for the latest hot fashion item, I was trolling through the Goodwill store extracting any clothing item that didn’t look like it was birthed in the 70′s. My friends refinanced their mortgages and lived a life of luxury. I, however, did not. I put my time, my money, and my life into a business with a vision that eventually, some day, I too, will be able to afford these luxuries my friends supposedly had.
So, while you physically arrive at the office at 9am, mentally check in at about noon, and then leave at 5pm, I don’t. There is no “off” button for me. When you leave the office, you are done and you have a weekend all to yourself. I unfortunately do not have the freedom. I eat, and breathe this company every minute of the day. There is no rest. There is no weekend. There is no happy hour. Every day this business is attached to my hip like a 1 year old special-needs child. You, of course, only see the fruits of that garden — the nice house, the Mercedes, the vacations… You never realize the back story and the sacrifices I’ve made.
Now, the economy is falling apart and I, the guy that made all the right decisions and saved his money, have to bail-out all the people who didn’t. The people that overspent their paychecks suddenly feel entitled to the same luxuries that I earned and sacrificed a decade of my life for.
Yes, business ownership has is benefits but the price I’ve paid is steep and not without wounds.
Unfortunately, the cost of running this business, and employing you, is starting to eclipse the threshold of marginal benefit and let me tell you why:
I am being taxed to death and the government thinks I don’t pay enough. I have state taxes. Federal taxes. Property taxes. Sales and use taxes. Payroll taxes. Workers compensation taxes. Unemployment taxes. Taxes on taxes. I have to hire a tax man to manage all these taxes and then guess what? I have to pay taxes for employing him. Government mandates and regulations and all the accounting that goes with it, now occupy most of my time. On Oct 15th, I wrote a check to the US Treasury for $288,000 for quarterly taxes. You know what my “stimulus” check was? Zero. Nada. Zilch.
The question I have is this: Who is stimulating the economy? Me, the guy who has provided 14 people good paying jobs and serves over 2,200,000 people per year with a flourishing business? Or, the single mother sitting at home pregnant with her fourth child waiting for her next welfare check? Obviously, government feels the latter is the economic stimulus of this country.
The fact is, if I deducted (Read: Stole) 50% of your paycheck you’d quit and you wouldn’t work here. I mean, why should you? That’s nuts. Who wants to get rewarded only 50% of their hard work? Well, I agree which is why your job is in jeopardy.
Here is what many of you don’t understand … to stimulate the economy you need to stimulate what runs the economy. Had suddenly government mandated to me that I didn’t need to pay taxes, guess what? Instead of depositing that $288,000 into th

Administrator answers:

He’s a jerk.
Find a new job ASAP

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