Apartments for Cheap

Questions and Answers

Your Questions About Affordable Apartments In The Bronx For Rent

December 29, 2012

John asks…

Where is the safest and most affordable place to live in the BRONX,ny?

its specifically for a young female,College student..that is does not want to get robbed or raped. Ive heard of Riverdale..:)…but any more suggestions? .But i know for a fact to stay away from the South BX. So this question is for the Native Nyorkers. Thanx :)

Administrator answers:

Brooklyn will provide you with both
Safety cannot be guarantee to anyone. But some areas are relatively OK
Ok here we go:
BTW, I don’t drive either.
Brooklyn is big borough. Most trains run through it to Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx
It used to have, say, Italian areas, Orthodox Jews, muslim ones. Now,mostly, all mixed. I am not saying it is worse. It is different. I live in “Italian” area Bensonhurst, and it is safe enough. You can walk in dark. (keeping my fingers crossed) average 1 bedroom (2 rooms) apartment would cost $1.200 + utility. Usually you get it from Realty States,, but they charge at least 1 rent. But landlord will give you a 1 or 2 year apartment lease, which guarantee you a lot. In apartment building with or w/out elevators. Private house apartment might cost little less. There are N an D train here. About frequency: rush hour it is Ok everywhere (just crowded), off rush hour, well you can wait say 20 min. There is no schedule. Trains are heated and A/C. So are buses.
Life in NY is rather crazy and chaotic, especially if you coming from small town (like I was), but once you get used to it, you will love it
Welcome
Hope I helped

David asks…

Why do so many poor Black people live in NYC?

How can they afford such expensive city!

Administrator answers:

Many people don’t actually know New York so well. I’m an insider, so allow me to tell you the story.

New York Coty is composed of five boroughs, or sections, which are the Bronx, Manhattan, Queens, Brooklyn, and Staten Island. From these, Manhattan is the richest and most beautiful, the one with the most action and night life – probably all the New York pictures in magazines and postcards that you saw were taken from here. The north part of Manhattan, however, is very, very poor. It’s called Harlem and is heavily inhabited by Africans and African Americans, who are not rich at all. In fact, many of them are either living in public housing (offered by the city) or getting the rent’s money from the welfare check.

The Bronx, the northernmost section of the city is also New York technically, where a large number of blacks and other minority groups live, such as Hispanics, Asians, Arabs, etc. It too is considerable inexpensive, and there is tons of public housing, and plenty of people live off the welfare checks – not everyone though. Personally, I consider it to be the worst county in America, but the Bronx Zoo is an amazing place to visit!

Many blacks live in Brooklyn. Some apartments are extremely affordable, and blacks live in them. Queens on the other hand, has some blacks that have progressed quite a lot – it is the only county in our country where African Americans can claim a higher income than Whites.

Staten Island is more of a suburban-styled borough, where the rich live, therefore it doesn’t have many blacks.

So, in a nutshell, not every place in New York is expensise, and blacks live in those inexpensive places.

William asks…

Can anything really happen in New York?

You always hear that small saying ‘Your dream can come true in New York’. This is referring to finding your dream job etc… Also is it cheap to rent there? Is it actually true?

Administrator answers:

Yes, it CAN be called the “city of dreams”! Everything of note can be found in this amazing city–good job opportunities, wonderful schools, amazing theatre and cultural arts activities, but as for rent…well, I’m afraid you pay for what you receive.

Many Manhattan STUDIOS can start out from 2 to $3000 a month, and from there the prices only become more exorbitant.

I WOULD say that if you’re looking for at least, somewhat more affordable rental prices in the NYC metro area, to try the boroughs. Queens and the Bronx are the least expensive compared to Manhattan and Brooklyn. In Queens, there are many a home owner who rent out basement and attic apartments in their residences, and these can be found at a much cheaper rent.

You can also find a roommate to split the rent with you, in order to find a place. Either way, it would be a little difficult, but definitely not impossible.

Mandy asks…

Just how expensive is life in New York City?

People always say it is a lot more expensive than the rest of the city.
How does it compare to mid-sized cities like Denver, Dallas, and Houston?

I ask because i just read this:

http://images.businessweek.com/ss/08/06/0613_best_cities_job/index_01.htm

It seems like living in New York City effectively halves your salary.

Can anyone explain or expand, please?
Is it as expensive to live in other boroughs, like Brooklyn or The Bronx?

Administrator answers:

Manhattan is astronomically expensive, and the outer boroughs are getting pretty bad, too. I move every few years and every time it gets harder and harder to find anywhere I can afford. I have friends in their 30s– people who, anywhere else, would be settling down and maybe buying their first home– and here, they still have roommates.
I just got a small one bedroom apartment for $1,000 a month in Bay Ridge, Brooklyn– it is probably a 30+ minute commute to the first train stop in Manhattan. I can see Staten Island from my apartment. Haha. It’s what you would tactfully call “out of the way”, and it took me forever to find, and it doesn’t include heat or hot water or ANYthing– and I feel damn lucky to have found it. My previous place was in a loft with 3 other roommates in an industrial park– we had to make our own bedrooms and it was $500 a month. (I lived with my ex-boyfriend, too, because initially my rent was $480 a month, and for that you’ll do pretty much anything.)

I’m getting dangerously close to “And I walk 15 miles uphill in the snow” territory, but I think most city-dwellers tend to rant occasionally, when given the chance. It isn’t the easiest way to live and I sometimes cringe, knowing what I could afford anywhere else– but I really can’t imagine living anywhere else.
And on the plus side, I live within walking distance of so many restaurants and stores and interesting parks that it really is worth it.
Plus, few people drive, so no one has to worry about gas prices. That is definitely nice!

Edit: If you’re thinking of living here, I don’t want to discourage you. It can be done, especially if you look into places like the Bronx or parts of Queens. There are even some affordable(ish) parts of Manhattan– parts of Harlem still have some good deals, and Inwood– the northernmost tip of Manhattan– is even more economical. I’ve found studio apartments up there in the $900s– which I passed up, because the commute downtown is nearly an hour. Worth it if you worked in Midtown, though.

*zombie voice* Come. Join us.

Donald asks…

How to find an apartment near NYC?

I want to find an apartment, so I can commute (public. trans.) to NYC to work! I’m having more trouble finding a place – than I am a job in NYC. some good areas (safe, affordable) for a single female near NYC to commute to work?? I would mostly like a place that’s in a complex if that’s possible too….

Administrator answers:

I just had to deal with this myself. I just graduated from school and am moving to Brooklyn this week. Where you end up really depends on what you define as affordable. I’m starting a career on Wall Street and while I’ll be pretty broke for a few years I can still afford more apartment than an newly minted English major. The rule in NYC is that your MAXIMUM month rent is 1/40th of your gross annual income (i.e. You need to make AT LEAST $40,000 to afford $1000/mo).

Brooklyn studios run $900-$1100 depending on neighborhood and proximity to subway lines. 1 bedrooms are $100-$200 more expensive than studios. Manhattan will have a premium of a few hundred dollars over Brooklyn or Queens depending on neighborhood (i.e. There are cheaper places in northern Manhattan in the Upper East Side and Harlem).

Brooklyn and Queens are about the same price but Brooklyn is a more convenient to Downtown and Queens is more convenient to Midtown.

As a rule of thumb, Staten Island sucks. I know nothing about the Bronx, except that it’s 200 block from Wall Street so I don’t care.

NJ is interesting because you can take the PATH train into Manhattan to WTC which is a huge subway hub. Look at Jersey City and Hoboken. New York City also has it’s own income tax within the 5 boroughs so that also makes NJ attractive, however you will be more likely to want a car to get around so it’s a trade off.

In NYC proper apartments “in a complex” will more likely be highrises with doormen and amenities like pools and you will pay for them, trust me. I’m living in a brownstone in Flatbush, Brooklyn a few blocks from the Q train which can get you to WTC. It’s a studio and it’s $950 with some utilities. The commute to work is probably 30 minutes.

In terms of actually getting the lease signed, you can look on Craigslist and avoid using a real estate broker. I tried that but most places were a little more ghetto than I would have liked. Being an out-of-towner I ended up going with a broker who charged a commision, but they were extremely helpful, showed me excellent choices in my price range, gave me neighborhood information, helped with finalizing the lease, etc.

If you are set on a highrise look at NYBits.com to find building managers. If you contact the management directly they can put you in an apartment and avoid a broker altogether.

Look on the New York Times website for brokers and properties. Look on Craigslist if you are feeling more adventurous and thrifty. Avoid the Village Voice because it’s all spam. Look at OnNyTurf.com for an interactive subway map that acts like Google Maps, it will help you see where apartments are in relation to subway lines.

Finally, the NYC real estate market is very deep and very efficient. In nearly every case you pay for exactly what you get – neighborhood/environment, transportation, building, and apartment. I also recommend a roommate if at all possible. It doesn’t help all that much to make the square footage cheaper but a full compliment of utilities for 1 person is a total waste. My cable/internet is TOTALLY bare bones, 10 channels and broadband, and after extensive comparison shopping it’s still $70…..you’d need a lot of gaming to make that worth it.

Linda asks…

my husband and i live in woodland hills, ca. we decided to move to new york. we’ve never been there so?

we don’t know where is the nice, safe and affordable place that is close to manhattan with good public transportation.also we can’t pay more than 1500 for rent. any recommendation? thanks

Administrator answers:

I don’t know what size apartment you want but $1500 can get you a 1 bedroom in Queens in a nice area, maybe a 2 or 3 bedroom apartment in some areas of the Bronx, and maybe a 1 bedroom or studio in some areas in Brooklyn and Manhattan. I would move to Queens or Brooklyn (Queens- Astoria, Long Island City, Sunnyside or Brooklyn- Fort Greene, Park Slope)

James asks…

Where do I find affordable apartments in New York City?

Administrator answers:

There is more than one way to go. Depending on your economic situation, you may be able to find help from various agencies that will subsidize at least part of your rent.

Also, if you can go in halves w/ someone you trust as a room mate, you can have a multi-bedroom apartment or even house to live in. I have seen ads for companies that will help you find a roommate if you don’t have one lined up already, but I can’t name any off the top of my head.

However, in general I found very little reason to live in NYC itself, when more affordable housing is available just over the river in New Jersey. We lived in the Bronx for 4 years and paid $1,500/month for a small one bedroom apartment w/ a bullet hole in one of the windows.

Now we live 20 minutes away and pay the same rent for a 3 bedroom house w/ a nice back yard on a quiet street. I cook on the grill at least twice a week.

In any event, I highly recommend you go to www.craigslist.org and browse around there for whatever you consider “affordable” in the town of your choice.

Best wishes!

Michael asks…

how can I find an apartment so I can work in New York City?

I want to find an apartment, so I can commute (public. trans.) to NYC to work! I’m having more trouble finding a place – than I am a job in NYC. some good areas (safe, affordable) for a single female near NYC to commute to work?? I would mostly like a place that’s in a complex if that’s possible too….
*what areas or cities in NJ do you reccommend?

Administrator answers:

I just had to deal with this myself. I just graduated from school and am moving to Brooklyn this week. Where you end up really depends on what you define as affordable. I’m starting a career on Wall Street and while I’ll be pretty broke for a few years I can still afford more apartment than an newly minted English major. The rule in NYC is that your MAXIMUM month rent is 1/40th of your gross annual income (i.e. You need to make AT LEAST $40,000 to afford $1000/mo).

Brooklyn studios run $900-$1100 depending on neighborhood and proximity to subway lines. 1 bedrooms are $100-$200 more expensive than studios. Manhattan will have a premium of a few hundred dollars over Brooklyn or Queens depending on neighborhood (i.e. There are cheaper places in northern Manhattan in the Upper East Side and Harlem).

Brooklyn and Queens are about the same price but Brooklyn is a more convenient to Downtown and Queens is more convenient to Midtown.

As a rule of thumb, Staten Island sucks. I know nothing about the Bronx, except that it’s 200 block from Wall Street so I don’t care.

NJ is interesting because you can take the PATH train into Manhattan to WTC which is a huge subway hub. Look at Jersey City and Hoboken. New York City also has it’s own income tax within the 5 boroughs so that also makes NJ attractive, however you will be more likely to want a car to get around so it’s a trade off.

In NYC proper apartments “in a complex” will more likely be highrises with doormen and amenities like pools and you will pay for them, trust me. I’m living in a brownstone in Flatbush, Brooklyn a few blocks from the Q train which can get you to WTC. It’s a studio and it’s $950 with some utilities. The commute to work is probably 30 minutes.

In terms of actually getting the lease signed, you can look on Craigslist and avoid using a real estate broker. I tried that but most places were a little more ghetto than I would have liked. Being an out-of-towner I ended up going with a broker who charged a commision, but they were extremely helpful, showed me excellent choices in my price range, gave me neighborhood information, helped with finalizing the lease, etc.

If you are set on a highrise look at NYBits.com to find building managers. If you contact the management directly they can put you in an apartment and avoid a broker altogether.

Look on the New York Times website for brokers and properties. Look on Craigslist if you are feeling more adventurous and thrifty. Avoid the Village Voice because it’s all spam. Look at OnNyTurf.com for an interactive subway map that acts like Google Maps, it will help you see where apartments are in relation to subway lines.

Finally, the NYC real estate market is very deep and very efficient. In nearly every case you pay for exactly what you get – neighborhood/environment, transportation, building, and apartment. I also recommend a roommate if at all possible. It doesn’t help all that much to make the square footage cheaper but a full compliment of utilities for 1 person is a total waste. My cable/internet is TOTALLY bare bones, 10 channels and broadband, and after extensive comparison shopping it’s still $70…..you’d need a lot of gaming to make that worth it.

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